Lancashire

Lancashire

County

The arms were officially granted on August 31, 1903, the supporters were granted on October 26, 1903.

The arms are quite simple, showing the famous red rose of Lancaster in a distinctive design. The red rose appears in most Lancashire towns and districts.

The crest and supporters are derived from the arms of the Ferrers family, earls of Derby. The lions, mascule and vair pattern all feature in the arms of the family who have been prominent land owners in the county.

Lancaster

The arms were officially granted on August 15, 1975.

The fleurs-de-lis and lion were part of the old arms of the city, and are themselves derived from the arms of the Duchy of Lancaster. The silver wave is for the River Lune and the wavy chief for Morecambe Bay.

The five red roses in the crest stand for five Lancashire councils combined. The fishing boat was the crest of Morecambe.

The supporters are similar to those used by the previous city council. They are differenced by a castle for Lancaster and a wheel for Carnforth, an important railway town. Each lion stands on a garb for the two Rural District Councils.

The motto “Luck to Loyne” was used by the previous City Council. Loyne is an old name for the River Lune.

1792 Lancashire Lancaster Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: John of Gaunt

Reverse:

Edge: PAYABLE IN HULL AND IN LONDON

D&H Lancashire No. 29d

Note from D&H: Nos. 29a to 29.g have the obverse struck from a worn and afterwards polished die, hence part of the design is absent.

1794 Lancashire Lancaster Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: John of Gaunt

Reverse: Line cuts before the H and after Y

Edge: PAYABLE IN LANCASTER LONDON OR BRISTOL

D&H Lancashire No. 44 rated RR (very rare)

1794 Lancashire Lancaster Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: John of Gaunt

Reverse: No period after legend, space between 17 and 94 wider

Edge: PAYABLE IN LANCASTER LONDON OR BRISTOL

D&H Lancashire No. 46

Liverpool

The arms were officially granted on March 22, 1797. Supporters granted on the 23rd of March 1797.

The arms show a cormorant with a piece of seaweed in its beak. The cormorant also appears on the crest. The supporters are a Triton and Neptune, the God of the sea. They hold banners with the cormorant and a ship.

The arms shows the importance of the sea to the city of Liverpool.

The cormorant is often referred to as the Liver Bird, and is used widely in the city. Liverpool was founded in 1207 by King John. He needed a new port to ship his troops to Ireland and to control the Irish Sea. The new town adopted King John’s seal as its own. The seal showed the eagle of St John holding a sprig of broom in its beak. The broom, or planta genista was the symbol of the royal house of the Plantagenets.
In 1644 the seal was lost and a new seal was made. For some strange reason the eagle was replaced by a cormorant, a more familiar bird in the area. It is likely that the artist mistook the eagle for a cormorant. The piece of broom was replaced by a piece of seaweed. The cormorant became later known as a mythical liver bird.

The bird also appears in the arms of Liverpool, Australia.

The motto can be translated as “God has bestowed these blessings on us”, and is taken from Virgil.

1794 Lancashire Liverpool Clarke’s Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A ship sailing, LIVERPOOL HALFPENNY

Reverse: Cormorant in shield surmounted by another, both holding seaweed in beaks, with bulrushes either side and legend: DEUS NOBIS HÆC OTIA FECIT 1794

Edge: PAYABLE AT LONDON LIVERPOOL OR BRISTOL.

D&H Lancashire No. 108d

Thomas Clarke was a grocer living at 12, Cable Street, and had a warehouse at No. 4, Marshall Street in Liverpool.

Manchester

The arms were officially granted on March 1, 1842. The supporters were granted one day later.

The golden bends in red are derived from the arms of the Lords of Manchester, who ruled the city prior to 1301. The chief shows a ship in full sail, a symbol of trade and enterprise. The crest shows a globe covered with bees, representing the world, to all parts of which the goods of the city are exported. The bees are a symbol of activity.The supporters, an antelope and a lion, are derived from the arms of King Henry IV, Duke of Lancaster.

The motto means ‘By council and work’, and is derived from a phrase in Ecclesiasticus 37:16 : ‘Let reason be the beginning of every work and let counsel go before every action’.

Halfpennies

1792 Lancashire Manchester Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse:The Grocers’ arms, HALFPENNY 1792

Reverse: EAST INDIA HOUSE

Edge: PAYABLE AT I . FIELDINGS MANCHESTER

D&H Lancashire No. 127 A. 76

1793 Lancashire Manchester Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: The Grocers’ arms. MANCHESTER PROMISSORY HALFPENNY 1 7 9 3 . D a t e closer together. The tufts
at end of Griffins’ tails formed of two lines.

Reverse: East India Co.’s bale mark, &c. Tail of & turns down, centre point of shield nearly touches second limb of v.

Edge: Blank

D&H Lancashire No. 131 A. 78

1793 Lancashire Manchester Fielding Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A porter carrying a pack. MANCHESTER HALFPENNY Ex: 1793

Reverse: Shield of arms, sic DONEC on a ribbon under, SUCCESS TO
NAVIGATION

Edge: PAYABLE AT I. FIELDINGS MANCHESTER

D&H Lancashire No. 135 A. 80

1793 Lancashire Manchester Fielding Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A porter carrying a pack. MANCHESTER HALFPENNY Ex: 1793

Reverse: Shield of arms, sic DONEC on a ribbon under, SUCCESS TO
NAVIGATION

Edge: PAYABLE AT BIRMINGHAM LONDON OR BRISTOL

D&H Lancashire No. 135a A. 80a

1793 Lancashire Manchester Fielding Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A porter carrying a pack. MANCHESTER HALFPENNY Ex: 1793

Reverse: Shield of arms, sic DONEC on a ribbon under, SUCCESS TO
NAVIGATION

Edge: Engrailed

D&H Lancashire No. 135e A. 80e

Shillings

1812 Lancashire Manchester Shilling Token

Obverse: Arms. MANCHESTER TOKEN. VALUE ONE SHILLING

Reverse: View of building, FOR PUBLIC ACCOMODATION . 1812

Edge: PAYABLE AT BIRMINGHAM LONDON OR BRISTOL

Dalton 6 (R)

Rochdale

The arms were officially granted on February 20, 1857.

The fleece, woolpack, cotton and millrind stand for the local wool, cotton and iron industries. The martlets are from the arms of the Rashdale and Derden families. The Deardens came into possession of the Rochdale Manor in 1823. The motto Crede Signo, is based on that of Lord Byron of Rochdale.

1791 Lancashire Rochdale Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A fleece, ROCHDALE 1 7 9 1 .

Reverse: A man weaving in a loom, HALFPENNY.

Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IOHN KERSHAW . X .

D&H Lancashire No. 140 A. 84

1792 Lancashire Rochdale Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: Arms and crest, ROCHDALE HALFPENNY. 1792.

Reverse: A man weaving in a loom.

Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IOHN KERSHAW . X .

D&H Lancashire No. 146

Peter Kempson

Rated as R (Rare) in Dalton & Hamer

A collection of predominantly English coins from the Tudor era to the present day

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