Dorsetshire

Dorsetshire

County

The arms were officially granted on February 21, 1950.

In 1889 the County Council (when first created) debated the question of a seal and settled on three lions passant, taken from the oldest seal of the town of Dorchester, surrounded by the words ‘The Seal of the County Council of Dorset’. After some discussion before the Second World War, the County Council applied to the College of Arms for a coat of arms in 1949, which was granted on February 21, 1950.

The three lions represent England and lions are found in the arms of Dorchester, Bridport, Lyme Regis, Weymouth and Blandford Forum. Lions’ faces are in the coat of arms of Shaftesbury. The fleur-de-lis appears in the shields of of Dorchester, Bridport, Wareham and Shaftesbury. The mural crown is designed to echo the insignia of the Dorset Regiment and the Society of Dorset Men and the golden dragon of Wessex or Wyvern represented the ancient kingdom of Wessex.

The motto of ‘Who’s afear’d’ was one of four originally suggested, including Lord Shaftesbury’s suggestion; ‘Excellence where Beauty Reigns’. ‘Who’s afear’d’ was adopted by the Society of Dorset Men in 1905 at the suggestion of Thomas Hardy. It was converted to Dorset dialect by them in 1908, and was suggested to the County Council by a Colonel C.D.Drew, then curator of the Dorset County Museum.

Poole

The arms were recorded at the Visitations of 1563 and 1623. Arms confirmed and Crest granted 19th June 1948. Supporters granted in 1976.

The wavy bars typified water, the dolphin and lion represent the “the king of fishes” and “the king of beasts” respectively. The dolphin reminds us what the custom was, and still is, i.e. maritime activity. This enterprise was the town’s chief source of prosperity from early times down to the middle of the 19th century.

The three escallop shells derive from the emblem of St. James and remind us that St. James is the patron saint of the parish church of the Old Town of Poole. The escallop shell was the badge of the pilgrim and crusader. Its presence on the Poole arms may also have been an allusion to William Longespee, the Lord of the Manor, and a gallant knight, who gave Poole its first charter in 1248 A.D. and who died in Egypt fighting for the Cross in the year 1250.

Halfpennies

1795 Dorsetshire Poole Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A figure of Hope leaning upon an anchor, &c.

Reverse: The Arms of Poole, &c.

Edge: I PROMISE TO PAY ON DEMAND ONE HALFPENNY . + .

D&H 6

Engraver—ARNOLD. Manufacturer—LUTWYCHE. Proprietor—J. BAYLEY.

Farthings

1795 Dorsetshire Poole Farthing Conder Token

Obverse: A figure of Hope leaning upon an anchor, &c.

Reverse: The Arms of Poole, &c.

Edge: I PROMISE TO PAY ON DEMAND ONE HALFPENNY . + .

D&H 10

Engraver—ARNOLD. Manufacturer—LUTWYCHE. Proprietor—J. BAYLEY.

Shaftesbury

Shillings

1811 Dorsetshire Shaftesbury Shilling Token

Obverse: Arms. . SHAFTESBURY BANK . LICENSED 14 MARCH 1811 The 14 same size as figures in date ; the point of shield is under the Y. Centre bar of shield to left is above a leaf.

Reverse: DORSETSHIRE WILTSHIRE AND SHAFTESBURY BANK TOKEN VALUE ONE SHILLING The F exactly over K.

Dalton 21

A collection of predominantly English coins from the Tudor era to the present day

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