Hampshire

Hampshire

County

The arms were officially granted on July 13, 1992.

The rose is the Lancaster rose, which has been used by Hampshire for many centuries. Why the rose was adopted is not certain. One account holds that the rose was granted by King Henry V after the battle of Agincourt. Another theory traces the rose to Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, brother of King Edward I and he also had many estates in Hampshire. When the Duchy of Lancaster was joined to the crown in 1399 the crown was added to the rose. These theories, however, are not proven. The oldest reference of a crown and rose date from 1681 in Stockbridge.

The lion supporter symbolises the fact that the city of Winchester was the Medieval capital of England, and the lion thus is the English lion. The two crossed swords are a symbol for the connection of Hampshire with the army.

The stag represents the New Forest, the royal hunting ground created by William the Conqueror in the 11th century. The anchor symbolises the connection with the navy.

The crest shows a Saxon crown and castle and symbolises the links with the Saxon Kingdom of Wessex, of which Winchester was the capital. The castle also symbolises the role of Hampshire in defending the country.

Emsworth

1794 Hampshire Emsworth Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A ship sailing, EMSWORTH.

Reverse: A female seated, HALFPENNY. 1794

Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IOHN STRIDE X X X X

D&H 10

1793 Hampshire Emsworth Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A female seated, HALFPENNY. 1793

Reverse: A dove flying, &c. PEACE AND PLENTY.

Edge: CURRENT EVERY WHERE —•— —•— —•—

D&H 11

1795 Hampshire Emsworth Stride Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: EARL HOWE & THE GLORIOUS FIRST OF JUNE

Reverse: Britannia seated, RULE BRITANNIA. 1795

Edge: EMSWORTH HALFPENNY PAYABLE BY IOHN STRIDE X

D&H 23 A. 11

Mule

1795 Hampshire Emsworth Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: EARL HOWE & THE GLORIOUS FIRST OF JUNE. Halfpenny 1795

Reverse: A large ship. THE GUARD & GLORY OF BRITAIN

Edge: PAYABLE IN DUBLIN OR X.ONDON + . + .

D&H 29b A. 112b

The Glorious First of June of 1794 was the first and largest fleet action of the naval conflict between the Kingdom of Great Britain and the First French Republic during the French Revolutionary Wars.

The action was the culmination of a campaign that had criss-crossed the Bay of Biscay over the previous month in which both sides had captured numerous merchant ships and minor warships and had engaged in two partial, but inconclusive, fleet actions. The British Channel Fleet under Admiral Lord Howe attempted to prevent the passage of a vital French grain convoy from the United States, which was protected by the French Atlantic Fleet, commanded by Rear-Admiral Villaret-Joyeuse. The two forces clashed in the Atlantic Ocean, some 400 nautical miles (700 km) west of the French island of Ushant on 1 June 1794.

During the battle, Howe defied naval convention by ordering his fleet to turn towards the French and for each of his vessels to rake and engage their immediate opponent. This unexpected order was not understood by all of his captains, and as a result his attack was more piecemeal than he intended. Nevertheless, his ships inflicted a severe tactical defeat on the French fleet. In the aftermath of the battle both fleets were left shattered; in no condition for further combat, Howe and Villaret returned to their home ports. Despite losing seven of his ships of the line, Villaret had bought enough time for the French grain convoy to reach safety unimpeded by Howe’s fleet, securing a strategic success. However, he was also forced to withdraw his battle fleet back to port, leaving the British free to conduct a campaign of blockade for the remainder of the war. In the immediate aftermath both sides claimed victory and the outcome of the battle was seized upon by the press of both nations as a demonstration of the prowess and bravery of their respective navies.

The Glorious First of June demonstrated a number of the major problems inherent in the French and British navies at the start of the Revolutionary Wars. Both admirals were faced with disobedience from their captains, along with ill-discipline and poor training among their shorthanded crews, and they failed to control their fleets effectively during the height of the combat.

Gosport

The borough does not use official arms. The arms as used on a JaJa postcard circa 1905.

1794 Hampshire Gosport Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: Helmeted bust of Sir Bevois. PROMISSORY HALFPENNY.

Reverse: large ship sailing. PRO BONO PUBLICO. Ex : 1794

Edge: PAYABLE AT I. IORDANS DRAPER GOSPORT X X X

D&H 41

Petersfield

1793 Hampshire Petersfield Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: A man on horseback, PETERSFIELD.

Reverse: A stork, standing upon a piece of ground, the bottom margin of which is irregular. PROMISSORY HALFPENNY 1793

Edge: EAMES HOLLAND & ANDREWS PETERSFIELD — x —

D&H 47

Portsmouth

1795 Hampshire Portsmouth Halfpenny Conder Token

Obverse: IOHN HOWARD . F.R.S. PHILANTHROPIST

Reverse: Britannia seated. 1795

Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE LIVERPOOL

D&H 57a A. 36a (mule with reverse of Hampshire D&H 21)

A collection of predominantly English coins from the Tudor era to the present day

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